{{ 'Go back' | translate}}
Njus logo

Community news | Njus Canada

Program expansion provides respite funding for special needs children

Community Energeticcity.ca

SURREY, B.C. – With the expansion of a program, more than 1,300 additional families with children who have special needs will benefit from respite services by qualified caregivers.As of March 31, 2018, approximately 3,900 families were receiving
'SURREY, B.C. – With the expansion of a program, more than 1,300 additional families with children who have special needs will benefit from respite services by qualified caregivers.As of March 31, 2018, approximately 3,900 families were receiving respite services.This program expansion will provide for 1,300 additional families and provide an increase in the base funding amount each family can receive. “We’ve heard how incredibly important respite care is for families,” said Katrine Conroy, Minister of Children and Family Development. “Parents can get so caught up caring for a loved one that they forget to take time for themselves.They often don’t have the luxury of asking a friend, neighbour or relative to step in for them.Respite offers them a chance to recharge and the peace of mind that comes from having a skilled professional they can count on with the training to meet their child’s unique care needs.” Respite funding allows eligible families to purchase services from a qualified person who will care for the child while the parents attend to other family priorities.Services are provided in the child’s home, the respite caregiver’s home or within the community.Eligibility is not based on a specific diagnosis.Children may be eligible for the program if they are assessed as dependent in at least three of four areas of daily living (washing, bathroom assistance, eating and dressing), or have a palliative condition.According to the government, once families become eligible for respite funding, they are also able to access a range of other programs, including access to a child and youth care worker, behaviour supports, parenting skills training, counselling, housekeeping and life-skills programs for children.Government is developing a new plan to better support children and youth with special needs and their families.It will guide how the ministry invests in and delivers services for children and youth with special needs, and will roll out in spring 2020.The $6.3-million boost to the Province’s respite program was announced in Budget 2019, and changes began to come into effect April 1, 2019.Five million dollars is being used to provide respite services for families who had previously been on the waiting list.The remaining $1.3 million is increasing the base annual funding amount each family can receive from $2,800 to $3,080, marking the first increase in respite funding since 1989.For more information on services available; CLICK HERE . The post Program expansion provides respite funding for special needs children appeared first on Energeticcity.ca .'

Ramsey visits Indigenous community suffering water crisis

Community Windsor Star

Local MP Tracey Ramsey (NDP — Essex) took a tour Wednesday of a northern Ontario Indigenous community that declared a state of emergency last week after drinking water tests showed dangerous levels of chemicals. Residents of Attawapiskat saw their
'Local MP Tracey Ramsey (NDP — Essex) took a tour Wednesday of a northern Ontario Indigenous community that declared a state of emergency last week after drinking water tests showed dangerous levels of chemicals. Read More'

Former N.S. Crown who suggested Mi’kmaq were a ‘conquered people’ fights for record release

Community APTN News

The Canadian Press A former lawyer for the Nova Scotia Department of Justice who presented a brief suggesting the Mi’kmaq were a “conquered people” and is suing […] . The post Former N.S.
'The Canadian Press A former lawyer for the Nova Scotia Department of Justice who presented a brief suggesting the Mi’kmaq   were a “conquered people” and is suing the premier for defamation had his efforts to release court records temporarily blocked Wednesday by the Supreme Court of Canada.Alex Cameron has said in his defamation action that Stephen McNeil and a former justice minister libelled him when they implied he acted without instruction when he presented the brief.Cameron wants exchanges he had with the government to be made public and to be admissible in court, while the province is arguing those documents shouldn’t be admitted due to solicitor-client privilege.The province lost its blocking argument when the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal ruled in May the documents can be unsealed, but it is asking the Supreme Court of Canada to overturn that decision.A judge from the high court issued a temporary stay on Wednesday to allow arguments to be submitted on whether the documents can be released.Cameron’s lawyer, Bruce Outhouse, says that after written legal arguments are submitted, it’s likely the issue of whether the court records are opened will be decided within weeks.The lawyer says it’s at that point that the public might finally see what his client was told.Cameron was removed as government counsel in an Aboriginal   rights case in December 2016 after suggesting in a legal brief the Mi’kmaq   were a conquered people who were owed no duty of consultation.The brief was part of the government’s defence when the Sipekne’katik band sought to overturn provincial approval of a plan by Alton Gas to store natural gas in salt caverns near the Shubenacadie River.After Cameron presented the conquered people brief, there was a public outcry from the Mi’kmaq   and others, and the province withdrew the document and disowned the argument.Cameron, who had a career spanning close to three decades with the province, retired on April 30, 2017 and served legal notice on the government two days later.In his affidavit, Cameron said the premier and then-justice minister Diana Whalen suggested he acted without instructions, or even contrary to instructions, in making the conquered peoples argument.He said the arguments “were in accordance with” the instructions he was given.Thus far, the former prosecutor has been successful in his efforts to have solicitor-client privilege waived in his lawsuit, but the province has continued to appeal.In the most recent decision, the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal said it would be “manifestly unfair” to allow the province to hide behind solicitor-client privilege while at the same time impugning the conduct of its solicitor.Premier McNeil has said his position has never changed regarding what happened. “At no time did I have any indication that was the argument,” he said. “It’s my understanding no one instructed him to do that.” news@aptn.ca @aptnnews . The post Former N.S.Crown who suggested Mi’kmaq were a ‘conquered people’ fights for record release appeared first on APTN News .'

'Where the hope lies': Sask. gathering of Metis youth looks to the future

Community Saskatoon StarPhoenix

The Journeying Home Gathering brings together Métis youth from the prairies and Ontario. The group is spending the week leading up to Back to Batoche Days learning about their history and fostering a sense of community.
'When she received her degree, Metis educator Angie Caron understood the meaning of her future Metis students being able to see themselves represented by their teacher. What she didn't realize was the impact it would have closer to home. Read More'

Yellowhead Trail changes will smooth traffic, but residents worry about noise

Community Edmonton Journal

The $1-billion Yellowhead Trail freeway conversion project, meant to smooth the flow of traffic, could create more noise in neighbourhoods like Abbottsfield, residents at a public engagement event said Wednesday night. “We don’t want to see it
'The $1-billion Yellowhead Trail freeway conversion project, meant to smooth the flow of traffic, could create more noise in neighbourhoods like Abbottsfield, residents at a public engagement event said Wednesday night. Read More'