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Saint-Lazare resident recognized by councillor for persistence in landslide issue

Photo yourlocaljournal

PHOTO BY JOHN JANTAKChaline Valley resident Richard Meades spent eight years relentlessly addressing his concerns for the area to elected officials.Work to stabilize the landslide zone in Chaline Valley is finally proceeding at full pace much to the
'PHOTO BY JOHN JANTAK Chaline Valley resident Richard Meades spent eight years relentlessly addressing his concerns for the area to elected officials. Work to stabilize the landslide zone in Chaline Valley is finally proceeding at full pace much to the relief of resident Richard Meades who spent the past eight years rallying city council to recognize the potential landslide situation and do something to resolve the problem. His efforts were lauded by newly elected District 3 Councillor Benoît Tremblay who credits Meades for his tenacity by constantly raising the issue at the town’s monthly council meetings. Tremblay, who was recently elected to council in a by-election in early June, also lives in Chaline Valley. ‘Took his civic duty to heart’ Tremblay said Meades is a perfect example of an individual who took his civic duty to heart by persisting in getting city council to work at rectifying the landslide issue. “He doggedly maintained his position. He pursued city hall regarding the problem presented by the Quinchien River and he finally succeeded,” Tremblay told The Journal during a telephone interview. Tremblay also commended Mayor Robert Grimaudo for working tirelessly to resolve the issue when Meades brought the issue to the forefront. “The mayor had the courage to go forward with the effort to convince the provincial government to finance the main part of the work,” added Tremblay. ‘Took his responsibility to heart’ “Mr. Meades, for me, has been the perfect example of our citizenry at work,” said Tremblay. “He took his responsibility to heart. He convinced his fellow citizens that he was working for the safety of everyone in the district. I’m impressed with him.” The possibility of a landslide first caught Meades’ attention in October, 2011 when a resident in Chaline Valley told him he wasn’t allowed to install a swimming pool because the area was prone to landslides. Meades went to city hall to get a map of the slide zone area. ‘Not something I wanted to keep secret’ News of the slide zone quickly gained attention among Chaline Valley residents after he posted the map at the community mailbox to make sure people were aware of the situation. Many citizens lauded Meades for making the issue public. Others criticized him saying his actions unnecessarily stigmatized the entire area and made it more difficult for homeowners to sell their houses. “I felt something this serious needed to be made public,” Meades told The Journal. “This is not something I would have wanted to keep secret, sell my house and slither away. I’m not like that. I’m an open, honest person. I believe in doing what’s accurate and helping people.” PHOTO BY JOHN JANTAK Stabilization current taking place in Chaline Valley along the Quinchien River in Saint-Lazare on July 15 that will help mitigate the possibility of future landslides in the area. All homeowners were stigmatized Ever since then, Meades dedicated his time persuading municipal council – sometimes forcefully – to take the matter seriously and do something to stabilize the affected areas even though his property wasn’t within the slide zone area. He attended all the public information meetings held by the province to inform residents of the status of their studies and possible solutions. He even ran for District 3 councillor in the 2013 municipal election but wasn’t elected. Not being in the slide zone didn’t matter to Meades. He feels all homeowners were stigmatized because the entire area was regarded as being in the actual slide zone area even if some houses weren’t. When asked how he feels about the work having begun, Meades replied, “After eight years – wonderful.” It’s going to be inconvenient lasting until the end of November. Since the issue came out, there’s no doubt people have had a lot of difficulty selling their homes. Nobody wants to buy a house in a slide zone. That cloud will finally be lifted.” A great relief “It’s a great relief,” said Tremblay. “I have a feeling when the work is completed at least the houses that are perched on the banks of the Quinchien River will be finally considered secure. It will change their status with the province, the houses will regain their value and life will pursue its normal course. “This is remarkable and I’m proud of Mr. Meades and others who worked with him,” Tremblay added. “It shows that if you’re persistent enough, believe in what you do and it serves a higher purpose, it works. It’s a lesson in citizenry.”'

Photo of the Week

Photo SkyNews

Milky Way and Airglow by David Moug There are many lights at night—some familiar, some not.
'Milky Way and Airglow by David Moug There are many lights at night—some familiar, some not.In this photo we can readily identify the brilliant beacon that is the planet Jupiter and, of course, the bright span of Milky Way flowing northward from Sagittarius into Aquila.But what are those subtle green bands stretching across the frame?They’re an atmospheric phenomenon known as airglow, or nightglow . The green tint comes from energy released by oxygen molecules—the same element that produces green auroras.However, despite their superficial similarities, nightglow and the aurora arise from distinctly different processes.David Moug captured the scene on May 28, 2019, from a site near Richer, Manitoba.He used a Canon EOS 6D DSLR camera and 24mm f/2.8 lens (working at f/3.0) for this 104-second, tracked exposure at ISO 2000. ( Click on the image to see a bigger version. ) See More Photos of the Week Enter the Photo of the Week Contest Do you have a superb night-sky photo that you think might be Photo of the Week material?Click here to find out how to send your photo submission to us.You could win one of five great prizes from Celestron, iOptron, Sky-Watcher, Mallincam, and Meade! . The post Photo of the Week appeared first on SkyNews .'

Mid-Engine Corvette’s Rear End Possibly Leaked in New Photo

Photo Motor Trend Canada

Chevrolet might be mad about this.A photo posted on Corvette Forum and Instagram shows what seems to be the undisguised rear end of the forthcoming mid-engine C8 Corvette.While it’s only a single, somewhat blurry shot, it provides one of the best
'Chevrolet might be mad about this.A photo posted on Corvette Forum  and Instagram shows what seems to be the undisguised rear end of the forthcoming mid-engine C8 Corvette.While it’s only a single, somewhat blurry shot, it provides one of the best looks yet at the hotly anticipated sports car.View this post on Instagram The new #Corvette #C8 #mecorvette #midenginecorvette Let’s break down what the photo shows.Stylistically it’s pure Chevy , with plenty of sharp creases and angles that build on the aggressive look of the C6 and C7 Corvette.Four taillight lenses are a signature Corvette design trait, although the design has been reinterpreted here.Whereas previous versions had four distinct lens elements, it seems that the C8 will have two taillight housings, each bisected by C-shaped moldings.Below the taillights are two large mesh-covered openings, presumably to allow airflow through the engine bay.While the C7 Corvette has small aero ducts next to the taillights, vents of this size and positioning are new to the C8—similar apertures are frequently seen on other mid-engine vehicles.Further down, we see four square exhaust outlets, two at each corner.This setup is a departure from previous generations, which from the C5 onward have arranged four circular outlets centrally in the bumper.Apparent too is the C8’s aerodynamic focus.Low on the bumper we see a diffuser to help direct air passing under the car.At the top, though, there’s a multi-channel wing that’s more complex than any previously seen on a regular Corvette.It looks to be the same design we’ve seen on camouflaged prototypes.We’ll have to wait and see if this is standard equipment or part of a package.Finally, and perhaps most obviously, the car is very blue.Red may be the traditional hue for America’s sports car, but we’re glad to see that Chevrolet will continue to offer the Corvette in other eye-catching shades.The C8 Corvette’s July 18 launch date is approaching fast, and other details are likely to leak out before then.We’ll share those with you, and we’ll be on the ground at the launch event in Orange County, California , to find out everything that will make this Corvette the best one yet.Read More 8 Mid-Engine Corvettes That Never Made it to Production Saying Goodbye: A Look Back at the C7 Corvette Source: absoluthank via Instagram,  Corvette Forum . The post Mid-Engine Corvette’s Rear End Possibly Leaked in New Photo appeared first on Motor Trend Canada .'

New photo app available for Secure Certificate of Indian Status applicants

Photo ibftoday.ca

Press Release From: Indigenous Services Canada Applying for a secure status card just got a bit easier with the launch of an app that allows applicants to take and submit photos with a smartphone.
'Press Release From: Indigenous Services Canada Applying for a secure status card just got a bit easier with the launch of an app that allows applicants to take and submit photos with a smartphone.July, 9, 2019 — Ottawa, Ontario — Indigenous Services Canada Indigenous Services Canada is proud to announce the launch of a new photo app designed to simplify the application process for a Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS). The photo app lets applicants take a photo with a smartphone and submit it online as part of their SCIS application.Available as a free download from Google Play and App Store, the new app will allow applicants to capture their own, eliminating the cost of a photographer and making the application process more accessible and convenient to First Nations people and communities across the country.The SCIS Photo App will allow the department to receive photos transmitted straight from smartphones into a secure database exclusively for SCIS applications.The photos can then be easily matched to the completed application form.All information provided through the app is encrypted, and collection and use of personal information is in accordance with the Privacy Act.Quotes “We are simplifying the way that Indigenous people, wherever they are, can provide important information for services.The new SCIS Photo App will eliminate photo costs and make the application process more secure and accessible for First Nations.” The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, P.C., M.P.Minister of Indigenous Services Quick facts The Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS), also known as a secure status card , was introduced in 2009 to reduce instances of fraud and identity theft by including security features and a photo.This innovative app makes it easier to take and submit a photo to include with the application by eliminating the need to get to a photographer and pay to have a photo taken.The app is easy to use and free to download on both Apple and Android smartphones.To protect the privacy of applicants, the app’s data is encrypted and sent over Internet to a secure departmental database as soon as the send button is pressed.No data is saved to the phone.Associated links Are you applying for a status card?SCIS Photo App Contacts For more information, media may contact: Kevin Deagle Press Secretary Office of the Honourable Seamus O’Regan Minister of Indigenous Services 873-354-0987 Media Relations Indigenous Services Canada 819-953-1160 SAC.media.ISC@canada.ca IBF5 . The post New photo app available for Secure Certificate of Indian Status applicants appeared first on Indigenous Business & Finance Today .'

The real ‘fake news’: how to spot misinformation and disinformation online

Photo CHEK

So you think a story or photo you’ve seen online might be fake – or exaggerated.Here’s what you need to know about fake news online.First tip – stop calling it fake news.
'So you think a story or photo you’ve seen online might be fake – or exaggerated.Here’s what you need to know about fake news online.First tip – stop calling it fake news. . The post The real ‘fake news’: how to spot misinformation and disinformation online appeared first on CHEK .'